Green Pool Cleaning

The last thing you want to see as you head toward the pool for a refreshing dip is green pool water. If you’re wondering, “Why is my pool green?” CPR Complete Pool and  Repairs we bring your pool back to clean and beautiful.   Also, we will inform you on the causes and how to avoid  them.

green pool water

How We Clean A Green Pool In 24 Hours

 The below steps to clear up your green pool in 24 hours:

  • Test the pool water
  • Balance your chemicals and PH accordingly
  • Remove any debris
  • Shock the pool
  • Brush the pool
  • Vacuum the pool
  • Run the pump for continually for 24 hours

If you’re searching for how to clean a green pool fast this post should help! Cleaning a green pool can be a challenging thing to do because this could be caused by weeks or possibly months of pool neglect. Subject to how bad the water is it could be something you can take on yourself, but if you have attempted previously with no results, it might be time to contact pool cleaning experts like CPR Complete Pool and Spa Repairs  particularly if you live around the Las Vegas, NV.   metro area.

Why is my swimming pool green?

There can be a multitude of reasons for a swimming pool to turn green, a lot of these can be tracked down to improper pH/alkaline levels, presence of metals, growth of algae, failing filtration system, or organic debris in the pool’s water. Some of these are easier to because there are tree branches, leaves, insects, or possibly clouded water floating in the pool. Nevertheless, something such as pH or alkalinity is required to be measured with a testing kit and then adjusted accordingly using chemicals such as chlorine or algaecide.

Why is my pool green with high chlorine?

It’s an unpleasant surprise to find your pool water green. You may wonder if it’s dangerous, or if you’ve done something wrong, or even if your jealous neighbors have pranked you. Most likely, the reason your pool water is green is a chemical imbalance. There are several reasons your swimming pool water might be green in both inground and above-ground pools, and the fix will be different depending on which kind of imbalance you have.
When the levels are properly balanced, chlorine will keep the algae at bay, but the water will slowly begin to turn green as the algae take over if there’s not enough. But be careful—adding too much chlorine in pool water can cause those metals to oxidize and turn the pool a different shade of green.